Architecture

The building that houses the Teruko Yokoi Hinageshi Art Museum was a wooden warehouse in the early days of the Meiji era (~1880s). At that time, the building was situated among the mountain villages of Kamitakara and Kiyomi (the current City of Takayama, Gifu) but it was dismantled and reconstructed again on its present location.
The stones used for the foundation are the same old ones transported from Takayama. The landscape walls were built with stones found on the fields of Nakanohoucho in Ena, Gifu.

  • The passage linking the two main museum wings was constructed mostly with reclaimed and salvaged wood. This corridor created an u-shaped museum layout which surrounds the courtyard.

  • Visitors can admire the graceful plum tree branches in the courtyard from the passage window.

  • From the window of the exhibition room situated on the second floor, visitors can enjoy the uninterrupted view of a variety of local flowers that change with the season, and the chestnut field that stretches behind the museum.
    The museum garden from spring to summer is covered by red poppies, which is Ms. Yokoi’s beloved flowers.
    Red Poppy is called hinageshi in Japanese, and the museum was named after the flower.

Beginning of the Museum

Relationship with Ena Kawakamiya
Dedicating a museum for Teruko Yokoi here in Ena, Gifu, despite her birth city being Tsushima, Aichi, is due to her encounter with the president of the company, Ena Kawakamiya, Mr. Kamada.
When Mr. Kamada was still in his twenties, he embarked on a backpacking trip through Europe that took him to Switzerland, where he had an opportunity to meet the artist.
“When I run my own business in the future, I would like you to paint a picture for me.” These words by Mr. Kamada marked the beginning of the dream of building a museum dedicated to the artist in Japan. This has now become a reality, and the museum offers the opportunity for people in Japan to admire her works.
The wrapping papers and paper bags used by Ena Kawakamiya are designed by Teruko Yokoi.

Images of the Four Seasons

  • 2014.2.9
  • 2014.5.6
  • 2014.3.23
  • 6月2
  • 2013.5
  • 6月
  • 2013.11.30
  • 2013.1.17

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